There are one’s legal obligations in Bridgeport, and then there is general decorum. Most believe that there is a marked difference between the two, yet there are cases where the lines between them may be blurred. An example might be that of a car accident. Say that you are involved in a car accident caused by another. It is common knowledge that the all parties involved (yet especially the driver responsible for the incident) are to remain at the scene until law enforcement arrives, accounts and information are shared, and everyone is given permission to leave. Yet what if you also happen to be injured? 

Decorum might certainly call for the driver responsible to render aid, yet is that a legal obligation. Per Section 14-224 of Connecticut’s General Statutes, the duty to provide aid extends not only the driver who may have caused an accident in which others suffer injuries, but also to anyone knowingly involved in such an incident. The question then becomes to what degree should aid and care be given. 

It is of course not expected that one provide life-saving treatment if they do not know how to do so, but a baseline expectation might be to immediately alert authorities of the situation. Once communication has been established with an emergency dispatch operator, instructions can be given as to whatever action you may require in order to sustain your life or soothe your pain until first responders arrive. Every moment counts when you and others require treatment for car accident injuries. Thus, a refusal to provide any sort of aid by any capable party may assign liability to them (or increase it were they the one responsible for the accident).