As a company driver in Connecticut, you can enjoy a number of perks such as not having to pay for gas or worry about wearing your car out when driving over long distances. However, if you get into a crash while driving a company vehicle, the situation can get complex quickly.

Vicarious liability is one term that you might need to know if you have gotten into a crash while in a company-owned vehicle. FindLaw notes that in a majority of cases, the responsibility for an employee’s actions will fall under the jurisdiction of their employer in accordance with “respondeat superior” – otherwise known as vicarious liability. This means that if you were performing within the scope of your duties and an accident occurred, your employer will be held liable.

However, there are some situations in which you might not be covered by vicarious liability. For example, if you were acting outside of the scope of said duties, such as stopping for food when not on a break. Vicarious liability is also nullified if you were engaging in any potentially criminal activity at the time of the accident. For example, if it is being argued that you were under the influence during the crash, your employer may not be held responsible.

Insurance policies are another important thing to check. You will want to understand what your employer’s insurance covers, including all situational payouts. If you find yourself in this sort of dilemma, consider contacting an attorney to discuss what your compensation options may be and how you may be protected.